Culture clash

A member of the household doesn’t ‘get’ Monty Python.

Now they don’t get ‘Mornington Crescent’.

They’re younger than me so is this cultural difference or the times moving on?

And what do I do with them?!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Academic paradox

The thoughts that come from trying to explain any research or construction project to someone who’s not involved in it:

http://phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1723

Something wonderfully ineffable about this one.

No wonder everyone’s keen to write it all up!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Progress

I’ve been learning to make Eton Mess, news that will upset my pancreas and teeth.

A few years ago at university this would have been fairly straightforward – I would have walked to my allotment, picked the fruit, eaten it fresh or frozen or jammed the remainder. Not bad for £26 groundrent a year shared between all of us. There was the small matter of what was in the soil, but given where it was it wasn’t that hazardous.

Now I have to buy it from a supermarket, shipped in from around the world, grown in ways I know not of and filled with I don’t know what.

Apparently, this is progress.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The wind rises

Last Saturday I saw ‘The Wind Rises’ at Covent Garden. It is to be the last film from Hayao Miyazaki of Studio Ghibli.

It’s the first time I’ve seen one at the cinema. Studio Ghibli did ‘My Neightbour Totoro’ and won an oscar for ‘Spirited Away’ so it’s a bit off that there are only three cinemas in the country showing ‘The Wind Rises’ as Studio Ghibli is still not ‘mainstream’ here, when it is a household name in Japan. I watched the Japanese language version with English subtitles and could tell that it wasn’t 100% translation – there were words in the German parts that didn’t appear in the English underneath. It was a good film anyway!

I can see why it’s a controversial film!It’s the story of Jiro Horikoshi. He wanted to be a pilot but couldn’t because of his eyesight, something children of all ages everywhere will be familiar with. But unlike them, Jiro ended up being chief engineer for Mitsubishi, designing planes instead. The historic events are accurate, such as the Kanto earthquake and firestorm of 1923 and the planes (including Mitsubishi zeros), but the thoughts are partly fictionalised and partly taken from his diary. It explores how engineers ‘make dreams into reality’, and that his planes were beautiful pieces of design allowing the impossible, but that each one was cursed because of its intended use. “I can make it fly faster, as fast as you want… but you’d have to take the guns off.”

[An abstract comment on pacifism and a practical comment about the guns and landing gear occupying the same space. Very Ghibli].

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Ch-Ch-Changes!

Another change of circumstances, which means I’m back to the computer.

Which means I must now, for various reasons, ensure that I don’t actually spend that much time in front of the computer. This isn’t about the cartoon in The Observer of “How can I write when the oven is so dirty?” but more that knowing of old that once I start researching something it’ll take nothing short of explosives or a large plunger to remove me from the chair.

So, in celebration of my new found interests I spent part of the day walking in the rain, washing the bathroom and kitchen floors and wondering which idiot decided that water-soluble wall paint was a really good idea. As the shower has broken, causing wails of torment from at least one member of the household, we decided that 11pm is the best time to take the bath apart and found what the last occupant did with expanding foam and a liberal approach to securing pipework. Long may such things continue as I hope they shall bring balance to life: getting constructive things done while also maintaining and improving the state of the place round here and making it a bit more liveable.

I think it must be an overhang of my student days that ‘improving a living space’ and ‘constructive’ count as different, parallel things. It relates to there being ‘maintenance’ and ‘progressive’ tasks – the first to go round in a circle to return to the same state, the second to move further forward by building on an earlier foundation: focusing just on maintaining means an eventual deterioration overall. I suspect part of it is a protest at those who feel that ‘progress’ involves staying indoors alone every day hoovering on the off-chance that someone might see it. Or to quote a mate from Uni, “When they think of the great scientists, they talk about their work, what they found, what they did – they never say, ‘And did you see the state of his kitchen cupboards?!'”

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

“I’m sorry Dave…”

OK, I give up.

After months of trying with the new laptop, which was bought as the physical structure of my elderly laptop had collapsed, I have now resurrected the elderly laptop that I bought a new one to replace. The new one came with ‘Windows 8′, named after the circle of hell that is right now being constructed for the designers. I have seen ‘Windows 8.1′ which apparently gives a start button that takes everything back to the menu that it’s virtually impossible to get away from in the first place. I even have a vague memory of there being a command that shows the open documents at the same time. But now it has reached the point where it is no longer possible to do any work with it or search for any previous files as the stress caused means the immediate task is forgotten as to even begin the collation of parts to do the task is so convoluted it is not possible to keep that many processes running in the head at once.

In context, my thesis required me to inter-relate the supply infrastucture of a city, something I did with no problem. Next time I’m buying a mac.

If anyone knows how to fix the old laptop so it’s portable, please let me know.

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Found gardens of Heligan

Just back from a couple of days in rainy Cornwall where I discovered that not everyone is such a fan of gardens as I am. 

Went round the Lost Gardens of Heligan, so called as every instruction says “Go via St Austell” but never quite manages to say in which direction, Tintagel, Boscastle and then Lydford on the way back. We were taking inspiration for any small gardening projects that we might attempt in the future: Peaches, nectarines, lemons, line, oranges, apricots, melons, squash, marrows, trained apples, all a possibility, but I draw the line at a gently steaming manure-fuelled pineapple pit.

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments